Saturday, 13 February 2016

Science report- whether the height of a person changes the breath rate, pulse and oxygen saturation after a set amount of excercise

Hello readers, This is the homework I was just doing on whether the height of a person changes the breath rate, pulse and oxygen saturation after a set amount of excercise- I know right!- Quite a mouth full!
Sorry to the readers in America- I think we spell exercise differently to you, as I am in Australia.

Hope you enjoy this "sophisticated text on science".
Oh, and one more thing, This information is not very conclusive, and is not to be relied on. We only tested two people, because we only had 4 people in the group, so this evidence can not stand on its own. It is more so we can work on our way of conducting experiments on our own.


Aim: To find out whether the height of a person affects the difference of breath rate, pulse and oxygen saturation of a person before and after a set course and amount of excercise

Independent Variable
Height of the person carrying out the exercise.

Dependent Variable:
The breathing rate, pulse rate and oxygen saturation of the person carrying out the exercise.

Controlled Variable:
1.    The course of exercise
2.    The type of exercise


Method:

Step 1: Measure the tall and short people’s breath rate, pulse and oxygen saturation.

Step 2: Send the short person out for the set exercise and measure their breath rate, pulse and oxygen saturation. Repeat this step three times for each measurement and record their results.

Step 3: Send the taller person out for the set exercise and measure their breath rate, pulse and oxygen saturation. Repeat this step three times for each measurement and record the results.

Step 4: Set the data up in a blank table and work out the difference between the short and tall person’s breath rate, pulse and oxygen saturation before and after the exercise.

Safety:
1.    Slipping on stairs- To avoid this, we made sure the short and tall people doing the experiment were going at a safe pace down and up the stairs
2.    Tightening the breath rate belt too tight- To avoid this, we made sure the short and tall people doing the experiment were in control of the tightening movements made by a team member. ie. The team member went at a slow pace, to ensure that the people being tested could stop the process at any time.

Results

Discussion:

WHAT:
The data for the breathing rate before and after exercise shows that, while there were some exceptions, the taller person has a higher difference in breathing rate after the exercise compared to the smaller person. It also shows that after the exercise, the taller person’s breathing was less consistent than the smaller persons.

The data for the pulse of the short and tall people before and after the exercise shows that once again, the taller persons data is less consistent than the shorter persons and their difference of pulse before and after the exercise is larger than the short persons. Also, the taller persons difference of pulse before and after the exercise was inconsistent and jumpy.

The data for the oxygen saturation remained very consistent, and both people had a difference ranging from a reading of three to a reading of minus one with a consistent reading of zero difference before and after the exercise so we could see a consistent trend in the oxygen saturation results.

WHY:
We can recognise that the breath rate increasing for both tall and short people. This was due to the fact that when being measured after the exercise, they were not being measured at a rest, but after exercise, even though it was a minimal amount of exercise. However, when being measured before the exercise, they were rested, as they had done no exercise previously.

It is also recognisable that the pulse of the people doing the exercise was increased after the exercise due to it being similar to the results of the breathing rate.

The results from the oxygen saturation suggests nothing like what the pulse and breathing rate results suggests. The oxygen saturation was not affected by exercise, suggesting that height or the little exercise performed by both short and tall people, is not enough to change or sway the oxygen saturation results.

EVALUATE:
The experiment performed was satisfactory, but could have been done to higher standards. The team of measurers were always ready when the two people performing the exercise returned and correctly and skillfully measured our breathing rates, pulse and oxygen saturation levels. Also, the production line speed of the recording of measurements was done well but, the actual exercise could have been performed better. The two people performing the exercise could have walked together, ensuring the same pace and distance covered. Also, the time that the experiment was performed could have been consolidated. We found ourselves speeding up and slowing down as we decided fit or to catch up to the other person. We also found the speed in different tests- like the first, second and third trials- were different, if only by a tiny bit. This could have changed the measurements we recorded.

FURTHER:

1.    A further investigation into weight and the different breathing rates, pulse and oxygen saturation would be interesting, and it would be interesting to find out if a heavier person had different oxygen saturation to a lighter person after the exercise, as this was not the case for height.
2.    It would be interesting to see if oxygen saturation levels were changed if the pace of the person was sped up, or if the course was lengthened, so that the course needed longer time. This would be interesting because we found that nothing changed the oxygen saturation rates, not even height.

Conclusion:

In conclusion, the height of a person affects their breathing rates and pulse rates but not their oxygen saturation levels. A taller person will have a bigger difference in their breathing rates and pulse than a short person’s, but the oxygen saturation of a person does not change with height, and therefore is not dependent on the height of a person.



Regards,

Richard Mills